Design a site like this with WordPress.com
Get started

BOOK SERIES REVIEW: Sidekick Squad by C. B. Lee (3.5 Stars)

Cover of Not Your Sidekick by C. B. Lee, depicting an Asian girl jumping across a gap, with a superhero zooming behind her on an orange background

Rating: Rating of three-and-a-half out of five stars represented by bumblebees (3.5 out of 5)

Welcome to Andover… where superpowers are common, but internships are complicated. Just ask high school nobody, Jessica Tran. Despite her heroic lineage, Jess is resigned to a life without superpowers and is merely looking to beef-up her college applications when she stumbles upon the perfect (paid!) internship—only it turns out to be for the town’s most heinous supervillain.

On the upside, she gets to work with her longtime secret crush, Abby, who Jess thinks may have a secret of her own. Then there’s the budding attraction to her fellow intern, the mysterious “M,” who never seems to be in the same place as Abby. But what starts as a fun way to spite her superhero parents takes a sudden and dangerous turn when she uncovers a plot larger than heroes and villains altogether. — Goodreads

Not Your Sidekick is such an enjoyable read. It was different from what I was expecting though, which almost caused me to DNF it after the first third. While Sidekick Squad is a YA series and the characters are YA age, the overall tone reads much more Middle Grade to me. However, I was able to settle into the read more easily after I realised that C. B. Lee’s style was intentionally casual and a bit cartoonish.

The plot bumbled along pretty slowly in the first half of the book and I never really got invested in the big-picture stakes. The book is trope-y to the point of being slightly predictable, but a well-written trope can be super fun. The romance between Jess and Abby is filled with fun tropes, like Jess crushing on her crush’s secret identity, and I loved it! It’s just kind of invigorating to get to read about queer girls falling in love in cute scenarios.

Overall, what really made Not Your Sidekick for me was the diverse representation. The main characters are all characters of colour and my favourite, Bells, is a Black transmasculine bi dude. The characters ask for each other’s pronouns when they meet and treat others in caring and respectful ways. I also loved Jess finding respect for herself and starting to realise her worth. The tone and writing may not have been a perfect fit for me, but the characters won me over and made me love this book in the end.


Cover of Not Your Villain by C.B. Lee, depicting a Black boy balancing on hovertrain tracks on a green background

Rating: Rating of three-and-a-half out of five stars represented by bumblebees (3.5 out of 5)

Bells Broussard thought he had it made when his superpowers manifested early. Being a shapeshifter is awesome. He can change his hair whenever he wants, and if putting on a binder for the day is too much, he’s got it covered. But that was before he became the country’s most-wanted villain.

After discovering a massive cover-up by the Heroes’ League of Heroes, Bells and his friends Jess, Emma, and Abby set off on a secret mission to find the Resistance. Meanwhile, power-hungry former hero Captain Orion is on the loose with a dangerous serum that renders meta-humans powerless, and a new militarized robotic threat emerges. Everyone is in danger. Between college applications and crushing on his best friend, will Bells have time to take down a corrupt government?

Sometimes, to do a hero’s job, you need to be a villain. — Goodreads

This second book in the Sidekick Squad series is told from the point of view of Bells, who was my favourite character in the first book. I was really excited when I picked up Not Your Villain, but my excitement waned a little when the first third of the book was mostly spent rehashing the events of Not Your Sidekick. But since it had taken me about that long to get into the first book, I persevered and was definitely not disappointed!

I love Bells so much. While his being trans is treated as a pivotal part of who he is, it’s not his defining trait. I really enjoyed the casual references to Bells wearing binders, injecting T-shots, and shapeshifting his body to assuage gender dysphoria. It’s just not the kind of rep you get to see every day, and it made me very emotional. My breaking point was when Bells arrived at a secret hide-out location after having to run and finding that his dad had taken emergency T-patches for him. I’m not going to lie, I teared up a little. Even though my own experiences don’t line up with Bells’ 100%, this representation still meant so much to me.

Again, I ended up loving this book in spite of not entirely jiving with the writing. I think the Sidekick Squad series would be great for both younger and older readers. If you’re looking for a read with low-ish stakes and tropes galore, this is one for you, especially if you hardly ever see yourself represented.

Not Your Back-Up, the third book in the series told from Emma’s point of view, is coming out today, and I will definitely be picking it up as soon as I get a chance. In Not Your Villain, Emma comes out to Bells as aromantic / asexual questioning. Being aroace myself and having read the previous two books and cherished the representation, I already know this will be another emotional but fun-packed read.


Have you read any of the Sidekick Squad books? Are you as excited for Not Your Back-Up as I am? Let’s chat in the comments below!

MINI REVIEWS: Empress of All Seasons by Emiko Jean (3.5 Stars), We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia (4 Stars)

Cover of Empress of all Seasons by Emiko Jean, depicting a naginata sword on a blue floral background

Rating: Rating of three-and-a-half out of five stars represented by bumblebees (3.5 out of 5)

Each generation, a competition is held to find the next empress of Honoku. The rules are simple. Survive the palace’s enchanted seasonal rooms. Conquer Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall. Marry the prince. All are eligible to compete—all except yōkai, supernatural monsters and spirits whom the human emperor is determined to enslave and destroy.

Mari has spent a lifetime training to become empress. Winning should be easy. And it would be, if she weren’t hiding a dangerous secret. Mari is a yōkai with the ability to transform into a terrifying monster. If discovered, her life will be forfeit. As she struggles to keep her true identity hidden, Mari’s fate collides with that of Taro, the prince who has no desire to inherit the imperial throne, and Akira, a half-human, half-yōkai outcast.

Torn between duty and love, loyalty and betrayal, vengeance and forgiveness, the choices of Mari, Taro, and Akira will decide the fate of Honoku. — Goodreads

Empress of All Seasons has been on my TBR for a while, so I was very excited to finally get to read it. I loved the Japanese-inspired setting and the way the world-building draws from Japanese legends.

I loved Mari so much. An outcast within her own class of yōkai, the Animal Wives, due to her plain looks, Mari’s objective isn’t to win over a husband with her charms and beauty, but with her fighting skills and resilience. I found the concept of a competition to survive the palace’s seasonal rooms really interesting, but I was disappointed in how the competition played out. The summary makes it sound like there will be a heavy focus on the competition, and unfortunately to me it all felt a bit rushed, preventing me from becoming invested in any of the other competitors.

Mari’s relationship with Taro also progressed rather quickly. I enjoyed their interactions, but I wish there had been more build-up to them falling in love. Overall, I feel like Empress of All Seasons may have fared better as a series instead of a standalone, giving the author more time to explore the story and its complexities.


Cover of We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia, on a stencilled background with flowers, doves, and flames

Rating: Four star rating represented by four bumblebees (4 out of 5)

At the Medio School for Girls, distinguished young women are trained for one of two roles in their polarized society. Depending on her specialization, a graduate will one day run a husband’s household or raise his children, but both are promised a life of comfort and luxury, far from the frequent political uprisings of the lower class. Daniela Vargas is the school’s top student, but her bright future depends upon no one discovering her darkest secret—that her pedigree is a lie. Her parents sacrificed everything to obtain forged identification papers so Dani could rise above her station. Now that her marriage to an important politico’s son is fast approaching, she must keep the truth hidden or be sent back to the fringes of society, where famine and poverty rule supreme.

On her graduation night, Dani seems to be in the clear, despite the surprises that unfold. But nothing prepares her for all the difficult choices she must make, especially when she is asked to spy for a resistance group desperately fighting to bring equality to Medio. Will Dani cling to the privilege her parents fought to win for her, or to give up everything she’s strived for in pursuit of a free Medio—and a chance at a forbidden love?

I was so thrilled when We Set the Dark on Fire came off hold at my library because queer Latinx girls! It took me a while to get into it because the pace was a little slow for me, but I’m ultimately glad I persevered. My favourite thing about this was definitely the relationship between Dani and Carmen. They were so into each other and I was so into them!

The plot and pacing weren’t entirely my cup of tea, and while I found the ending confusing, the book was well-written. I enjoyed Dani coming into her own, and discovering her strengths as well as her feelings for Carmen. If societal intrigue, spies, and forbidden love are your thing, you will love We Set the Dark on Fire.


Have you read these books? What did you think? Let’s chat in the comments below!

BOOK REVIEW: The Brilliant Death by Amy Rose Capetta (3.5 Stars)

Cover of The Brilliant Death by Amy Rose Capetta, depicting a dagger with a feather as its blade on a vibrant orange background

Rating: Rating of three-and-a-half out of five stars represented by bumblebees (3.5 out of 5)

For Teodora DiSangro, a mafia don’s daughter, family is fate.

All her life, Teodora has hidden the fact that she secretly turns her family’s enemies into music boxes, mirrors, and other decorative objects. After all, everyone in Vinalia knows that stregas—wielders of magic—are figures out of fairytales. Nobody believes they’re real.

Then the Capo, the land’s new ruler, sends poisoned letters to the heads of the Five Families that have long controlled Vinalia. Four lie dead and Teo’s beloved father is gravely ill. To save him, Teo must travel to the capital as a DiSangro son—not merely disguised as a boy, but transformed into one.

Enter Cielo, a strega who can switch back and forth between male and female as effortlessly as turning a page in a book. Teo and Cielo journey together to the capital, and Teo struggles to master her powers and to keep her growing feelings for Cielo locked in her heart. As she falls in love with witty, irascible Cielo, Teo realizes how much of life she’s missed by hiding her true nature. But she can’t forget her mission, and the closer they get to the palace, the more sinister secrets they uncover about what’s really going on in their beloved country—and the more determined Teo becomes to save her family at any cost.

I’ve been yearning to read this book ever since I first heard about it a couple of months ago. Non-binary representation is still few and far between, and being agender myself, discovering a book has non-binary characters is like having my birthday and Christmas on the same day.

The Brilliant Death follows Teodora, who uses her carefully hidden magic powers to rid her family of their enemies. She’s her father’s eldest daughter, but being a girl, she can never inherit the title of family head, and her most fervent wish is to be a di Sangro son. She finally gets her wish when she has to transform herself into a boy and journey to Amalia as her family’s representative in the wake of her father’s poisoning, accompanied by another strega, Cielo.

I occasionally thought that the writing was a little bumpy, and especially in the beginning, the pacing was slightly off. The writing is still engaging though, and the further I got into the book, the less I wanted to put it down.

I really enjoyed Teo’s character development. She grows so much over the course of the book. Growing up as a mafia don’s child has left her with a warped sense of morality, but in her pursuit of power, she re-evaluates right and wrong. At the end of the book, she makes a pivotal decision that I didn’t see coming but cheered for nonetheless.

It felt like I had spent my entire life speaking a secret language and then stumbled on someone else who was perfectly fluent.

I also loved the relationship between Teo and Cielo. As they journey across the mountains and navigate court, they teach each other about magic and power, family and gender. They slowly fall in love, and while they often tease and bicker, they share some deep moments as well. Their attraction to each other is palpable, no matter which form either Cielo or Teo take, and there are a couple of really hot scenes between the two characters. Hoo boy, does this author know how to cook up some sexual tension.

“It’s true that I contain more than one thing,” Cielo said. “And sometimes the balance shifts.”

I do have some critical thoughts on the non-binary representation. I loved Cielo as a character, but the binarism and biological essentialism in the exploration of gender bothered me.

“I can’t figure out if I should be using the word he or she or something else entirely.” (…)

“Either will do,” Cielo said. (…) “Though all of those words feel a bit like coats that are too tight in the elbows.”

I feel like this was a missed opportunity to introduce either they pronouns or maybe even neo-pronouns, instead of pushing the narrative that there are two ill-fitting options to choose from. Cielo is genderfluid, and it rankles that Teo always uses she when Cielo is in their “girlish body” and he when Cielo is in their “boyish body”, reinforcing the idea that certain pronouns match certain bodies.

A true non-binary exploration of gender should challenge the idea that any one type of body has a certain gender, or that certain biological traits mark you as a boy or a girl. Considering the author is non-binary herself, I was expecting a lot better.

The queer representation was great. Neither Teo’s nor Cielo’s sexuality is ever stated outright, but it’s safe to assume from the text that they’re both some flavour of queer, and Teo makes her attraction to women quite clear more than once. Overall, I would have appreciated some more diverse representation, especially with regards to race and disability.

Even though it’s not perfect, I really enjoyed The Brilliant Death, and I’m glad that this book has put Amy Rose Capetta on my radar. I will definitely be checking out some of her other books, first and foremost Once & Future, since I received an eARC for that one. I’m excited!


Have you read The Brilliant Death or any of the author’s other books? Let’s chat in the comments below!

BOOK REVIEW: Let’s Talk About Love by Claire Kann

Cover of Let's Talk About Love by Claire Kann depicting a black girl with a beautiful big afro

Rating: Rating of three-and-a-half out of five stars represented by bumblebees (3.5 out of 5)

Alice had her whole summer planned. Non-stop all-you-can-eat buffets while marathoning her favorite TV shows (best friends totally included) with the smallest dash of adulting–working at the library to pay her share of the rent. The only thing missing from her perfect plan? Her girlfriend (who ended things when Alice confessed she’s asexual). Alice is done with dating–no thank you, do not pass go, stick a fork in her, done.

But then Alice meets Takumi and she can’t stop thinking about him or the rom com-grade romance feels she did not ask for (uncertainty, butterflies, and swoons, oh my!).

When her blissful summer takes an unexpected turn, and Takumi becomes her knight with a shiny library employee badge (close enough), Alice has to decide if she’s willing to risk their friendship for a love that might not be reciprocated—or understood.

Let’s Talk About Love is Claire Kann’s debut YA novel featuring Alice, a black asexual biromantic girl, as the lead. It’s this promise of amazing representation that made me pick up this novel, even though I don’t usually go for non-speculative YA. It’s not that I don’t like or respect the genre, but I tend to not enjoy it as much as speculative fiction. I just don’t get as easily invested when the stakes are interpersonal relationships rather than, say, the fate of the world, but I don’t feel like that’s a shortcoming of the genre.

However, I did feel like the drama in Let’s Talk About Love was sometimes overly manufactured, to the point where it honestly didn’t make sense to me. This especially goes for the conflict between Alice and her almost life-long best friend Feenie. Feenie’s issues with Alice seemed completely unreasonable to me, but that’s not how they were treated, which was confusing and frustrating.

In addition, the narrative voice tried a tad too hard to be whimsical, while missing the mark on humour for me. I was still able to enjoy it though, and I ended up being very invested in the outcome of Alice’s relationship with Takumi. And most importantly, the asexual representation made me feel so seen and understood.

I’ve never in my life read a book with an asexual main character whose asexuality was spelled out so explicitly. Although it irked me that the author chose to include objects and animals under aesthethic attraction, there were other passages that made me feel so happy. There is some ace-phobia that’s also intertwined with racism and the hypersexualisation of black women, but it is made clear that those attitudes are ace-phobic and racist. That doesn’t mean they might not still be upsetting for some people, hence why I’m including this warning.

Ultimately, though, I found this a heartwarming read. Let’s Talk About Love is going to be so important for so many asexual kids out there, especially asexual black girls, and just for that I’m glad it exists even though it didn’t tick all the boxes for me personally. And now I’m going to leave you with my absolute favourite passage from the book that may or may not have made me tear up a little.

I want someone to give me flowers and take me on dates. I want to fall in love and wear a giant princess dress at my wedding. I want to have a happy ending, too, and all that other magical stuff. I want what books and TV and the world has promised me. It’s not fair that I should have to want sex to have it.


Cover of If It Makes You Happy by Claire Kann featuring a beautiful fat black girl with braids

Also, there’s good news for YA lovers: Claire Kann has another YA rom-com featuring a queer fat black girl and a baking competition, If It Makes You Happy, coming out in June 2019. It sounds great, so I’m definitely considering giving it a read.

MINI REVIEWS: Aru Shah and the End of Time, Scarlett Undercover

I just finished Aru Shah and the End of Time, but it’s been a while since I read Scarlett Undercover. I still wanted to share my thoughts about it though, and since both of these have shared themes of mythology and sisterhood, I figured I’d stick them in a Mini Reviews post together.


Aru Shah and the End of Time by Roshani Chokshi

Cover of Aru Shah and the End of Time by Roshani Chokshi

Rating: Three star rating represented by three bumblebees (3 out of 5)

Twelve-year-old Aru Shah has a tendency to stretch the truth in order to fit in at school. One day, three schoolmates show up at Aru’s doorstep to catch her in a lie. They don’t believe her claim that the museum’s Lamp of Bharata is cursed, and they dare Aru to prove it. Just a quick light, Aru thinks. Then she can get herself out of this mess and never ever fib again.

But lighting the lamp has dire consequences. She unwittingly frees the Sleeper, an ancient demon whose duty it is to awaken the God of Destruction. The only way to stop the demon is to find the reincarnations of the five legendary Pandava brothers and journey through the Kingdom of Death. But how is one girl in Spider-Man pajamas supposed to do all that?

I’m a huge fan of Rick Riordan and I love learning about mythology. I’ve been looking forward to picking up the Rick Riordan Presents books ever since they were announced, and Aru Shah and the End of Time was no exception.

Going especially by the more recent Riordan books, my expectations may have set an unfair example for Aru Shah and the End of Time to live up to. It just just skewed a bit younger than I was expecting, which dampened my enjoyment a little. The writing was on the simpler side, and everything seemed to happen too quickly for my taste. It felt like the solutions to the protagonists’ problems kept falling into their laps more often than not.

However, I still think this would be a very enjoyable book for younger kids. Aru is a spunky but vulnerable heroine, and I loved the relationship between her and her found sister, Mini. Another focal relationship is the one between Aru and her mother, which grows closer as Aru learns more about the past and her family’s secret. The bits from Hindu mythology were sometimes fun, sometimes brutal, always fascinating – as mythology tends to be.

I don’t think I will be picking up the next book in this series because it wasn’t entirely my cup of tea, but I will definitely still be giving Chokshi’s books for older readers a try!


Scarlett Undercover by Jennifer Latham

Cover of Scarlett Undercover by Jennifer Latham

Rating: Five star rating represented by five bumblebees (5 out of 5)

Meet Scarlett, a smart, sarcastic, kick-butt, Muslim American heroine, ready to take on crime in her hometown of Las Almas. When a new case finds the private eye caught up in a centuries-old battle of evil genies and ancient curses, Scarlett discovers that her own family secrets may have more to do with the situation than she thinks — and that cracking the case could lead to solving her father’s murder.

I was in a weird headspace while reading this book so I’m a little fuzzy on the details, but this was without a doubt one of my favourite reads of 2018. Some time had passed between this first landing on my TBR and my finally picking up and I didn’t reread the synopsis then, so I was surprised and delighted by the supernatural and mythological elements of this.

With regards to tone and subject matter, this might best be described as Veronica Mars meets Rivers of London, but it’s so much more than that. It’s unique, the main character has an engaging voice, and the action is fast-paced and character-driven. Again, I especially enjoyed the bond between Scarlett and her older sister Reem who both clearly love each other a lot. I appreciated that Reem wasn’t entirely relegated to the maternal role even though they are orphans, but is a kick-ass in her own right.

The representation is great. Aside from having a diverse cast of Muslim American characters, this book is also repping Black Jews, which is still all too rare. I’m not sure whether there will be a sequel, but if there was I would snap it up in seconds. Scarlett Undercover is definitely a candidate for a reread. I would recommend it to anyone who loves a gumshoe mystery with a supernatural twist (with content warnings for parental death and teenage suicide.)

BOOK SERIES REVIEW: The Graceling Trilogy by Kristin Cashore

I only really warmed up to the Graceling trilogy by Kristin Cashore with the second book, Fire (haha, get it? warmed up?) I’m so glad I stuck with it after my initial reservations because it just kept getting better and better. This is why all three books ended up with different ratings:

Graceling: Three star rating represented by three bumblebees (3 out of 5 Ramblebees)

Fire: Four star rating represented by four bumblebees (4 out of 5 Ramblebees)

Bitterblue: Five star rating represented by five bumblebees (5 out of 5 Ramblebees)

The overarching theme of the trilogy is young women finding their place in the world in the face of difficult choices, and reclaiming their kindness in adverse circumstances, both of which happen to be some of my favourite tropes.

The covers of Graceling, Fire, and Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore

Graceling is the first book in the trilogy. It tells the story of Lady Katsa, niece and executor to her tyrannical uncle, King Randa of the Midluns in the Seven Kingdoms. Marked as a graceling by her differently coloured eyes and graced with killing, she’s a threat to all who cross King Randa, until she decides to defy her uncle. She builds an underground organisation known as the Council which fights against the many abuses of power in the Seven Kingdoms. In the course of her work with the organisation, Katsa realises King Leck of Monsea is not all that he claims to be. As she races to rescue his ten-year-old daughter from his tyrannical clutches, she not only discovers new truths but new strengths as well.

Fire, the second book in the trilogy, is a prequel to Graceling. Set in a country East of the Seven Kingdoms, it tells the story of the Lady Fire, a so-called monster with colourful hair and the gift of reading and molding people’s thoughts. Her now dead monster father and abuser, once adviser to the king, has plunged the kingdom into upheaval with his taste for chaos. With civil war imminent, Fire has to decide whether or not to use her abilities without becoming like her father.

The third book, Bitterblue, picks up eight years after Graceling left off. The now eighteen-year-old Bitterblue is Queen of Monsea but feels like she has no knowledge about or control over her kingdom. Her advisers’ curious lies and evasions both about her father’s past reign and the present conditions in the kingdom lead her to investigate. With the support of Katsa and her Council friends, Bitterblue sets off in search of the truth and discovers that the wounds from her father’s reign she considered healed are more present than ever, and that it will be a long road towards recovery.

I enjoyed Graceling well enough, but it had a few flaws that nearly made me abandon the trilogy. The world-building was interesting and I liked the characters and their relationships with each other, especially the bond between Katsa and Bitterblue. However, plot-wise the book felt closer to a draft than a finished product. All of the important story elements were there, but they were rather loosely connected and didn’t quite knit together into a satisfying arc. The story could have benefitted from being stretched out a little, which would have made the plot twists less predictable.

I had gone into this book with high expectations because it had been recommended to me as great asexual representation several times, so I was a bit disappointed that the writing let down the great premise and characters. However, a friend assured me that I would enjoy the remaining books in the trilogy which led me to pick up Fire after all.

Fire still had some of the same weaknesses that Graceling did, but less markedly so. I again would have preferred a bit more stringency in pulling all the different story elements together, but the plot was overall coherent and satisfying. In spite of this, I found myself wishing time and time again that Fire had been the first book in the trilogy. I suspect that the author chose to publish the books out of chronological order so that the revelation of Leck’s grace would have more of an impact, but as mentioned above the twists in Graceling were predictable due to its slight incoherency. Only a couple of tweaks would have been necessary to publish the books in chronological order, which in my opinion would have worked in favour of coherency. Looking back while reading Fire, I appreciated Graceling a lot more, and I feel like I would have enjoyed it more if I had read Fire first.

The final book in the trilogy, Bitterblue, unequivocally blew me away. It picked up all the loose ends from the previous two books and combined them masterfully into a nail-biting finale. Cashore’s writing evolves wonderfully throughout the trilogy, and it was fascinating to see her real skills unfold and shine in this third book. The characters’ motivations were more implicit, which held me in suspense waiting for the myriad questions and inconsistencies to be resolved. Being fed the conclusion trickle by trickle was sweet agonising torture and I loved every bit of it. Bitterblue coming into her own as both a woman and a queen was exciting to watch. It was a bit different from both Katsa’s and Fire’s arcs considering that both of them had an inherent physical power that they needed to come to grips with, while Bitterblue had to consolidate and grow into a less tangible power, but the overarching theme was still very much present, tying all three of the books together.

I appreciated the fact that all three of the female main characters were allowed to be emotional and unreasonable at times without being labelled as hysterical. Emotional outbursts were treated as natural, and they didn’t result in the other characters respecting either Katsa, Fire, or Bitterblue any less.

In addition to her great treatment of women, Cashore also had a diverse cast of characters. Characters’ differing looks and complexions were described casually. There were a number of physically disabled characters. One important character and love interest loses his eyesight, another supporting character is without use of his legs and uses a wheelchair, and one of the main characters loses two fingers due to frostbite and has to relearn how to use her hand. Of course, there are also a whole slew of characters who suffer from trauma and related mental illness. A word of warning though: the circumstances that these characters’ trauma results from are brutal and upsetting, including emotional and physical abuse and even rape, so the trilogy might be triggering for some readers.

The queer representation was okay. Katsa can very easily be read as being on the asexual and aromantic spectrum, while Fire explicitly states her attraction to women and men. In spite of two out of three main characters being queer women though, all of the main relationships in the Graceling trilogy are M/F, which I found a bit disappointing. There are however two explicitly queer supporting couples, one of them F/F and one of them M/M.

Overall, I really ended up loving this trilogy, even though it didn’t start out as strong as it could have.