BOOK SERIES REVIEW: Sidekick Squad by C. B. Lee (3.5 Stars)

Cover of Not Your Sidekick by C. B. Lee, depicting an Asian girl jumping across a gap, with a superhero zooming behind her on an orange background

Rating: Rating of three-and-a-half out of five stars represented by bumblebees (3.5 out of 5)

Welcome to Andover… where superpowers are common, but internships are complicated. Just ask high school nobody, Jessica Tran. Despite her heroic lineage, Jess is resigned to a life without superpowers and is merely looking to beef-up her college applications when she stumbles upon the perfect (paid!) internship—only it turns out to be for the town’s most heinous supervillain.

On the upside, she gets to work with her longtime secret crush, Abby, who Jess thinks may have a secret of her own. Then there’s the budding attraction to her fellow intern, the mysterious “M,” who never seems to be in the same place as Abby. But what starts as a fun way to spite her superhero parents takes a sudden and dangerous turn when she uncovers a plot larger than heroes and villains altogether. — Goodreads

Not Your Sidekick is such an enjoyable read. It was different from what I was expecting though, which almost caused me to DNF it after the first third. While Sidekick Squad is a YA series and the characters are YA age, the overall tone reads much more Middle Grade to me. However, I was able to settle into the read more easily after I realised that C. B. Lee’s style was intentionally casual and a bit cartoonish.

The plot bumbled along pretty slowly in the first half of the book and I never really got invested in the big-picture stakes. The book is trope-y to the point of being slightly predictable, but a well-written trope can be super fun. The romance between Jess and Abby is filled with fun tropes, like Jess crushing on her crush’s secret identity, and I loved it! It’s just kind of invigorating to get to read about queer girls falling in love in cute scenarios.

Overall, what really made Not Your Sidekick for me was the diverse representation. The main characters are all characters of colour and my favourite, Bells, is a Black transmasculine bi dude. The characters ask for each other’s pronouns when they meet and treat others in caring and respectful ways. I also loved Jess finding respect for herself and starting to realise her worth. The tone and writing may not have been a perfect fit for me, but the characters won me over and made me love this book in the end.


Cover of Not Your Villain by C.B. Lee, depicting a Black boy balancing on hovertrain tracks on a green background

Rating: Rating of three-and-a-half out of five stars represented by bumblebees (3.5 out of 5)

Bells Broussard thought he had it made when his superpowers manifested early. Being a shapeshifter is awesome. He can change his hair whenever he wants, and if putting on a binder for the day is too much, he’s got it covered. But that was before he became the country’s most-wanted villain.

After discovering a massive cover-up by the Heroes’ League of Heroes, Bells and his friends Jess, Emma, and Abby set off on a secret mission to find the Resistance. Meanwhile, power-hungry former hero Captain Orion is on the loose with a dangerous serum that renders meta-humans powerless, and a new militarized robotic threat emerges. Everyone is in danger. Between college applications and crushing on his best friend, will Bells have time to take down a corrupt government?

Sometimes, to do a hero’s job, you need to be a villain. — Goodreads

This second book in the Sidekick Squad series is told from the point of view of Bells, who was my favourite character in the first book. I was really excited when I picked up Not Your Villain, but my excitement waned a little when the first third of the book was mostly spent rehashing the events of Not Your Sidekick. But since it had taken me about that long to get into the first book, I persevered and was definitely not disappointed!

I love Bells so much. While his being trans is treated as a pivotal part of who he is, it’s not his defining trait. I really enjoyed the casual references to Bells wearing binders, injecting T-shots, and shapeshifting his body to assuage gender dysphoria. It’s just not the kind of rep you get to see every day, and it made me very emotional. My breaking point was when Bells arrived at a secret hide-out location after having to run and finding that his dad had taken emergency T-patches for him. I’m not going to lie, I teared up a little. Even though my own experiences don’t line up with Bells’ 100%, this representation still meant so much to me.

Again, I ended up loving this book in spite of not entirely jiving with the writing. I think the Sidekick Squad series would be great for both younger and older readers. If you’re looking for a read with low-ish stakes and tropes galore, this is one for you, especially if you hardly ever see yourself represented.

Not Your Back-Up, the third book in the series told from Emma’s point of view, is coming out today, and I will definitely be picking it up as soon as I get a chance. In Not Your Villain, Emma comes out to Bells as aromantic / asexual questioning. Being aroace myself and having read the previous two books and cherished the representation, I already know this will be another emotional but fun-packed read.


Have you read any of the Sidekick Squad books? Are you as excited for Not Your Back-Up as I am? Let’s chat in the comments below!

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